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JONES, Isaac and Sophia Owens

The Jones family was one of many who prospered during the heyday of lumbering in the Upper Ottawa Valley. Westmeath Township’s main lumber baron was Alexander Fraser (1830-1903); and his two sons John Burns (JB) Fraser (1859-1939)  & William Henry Alexander (W.H.A.) Fraser (1863-1918) carried on the family legacy. See FRASER entry. Solomon Jones Jr. and so many others worked  for the Frasers – however Solomon filled a very important role;  first serving as lumber agent and ...

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MCCRACKEN, brothers Allan & Thomas

In the 1851 Agricultural Census for Westmeath Township, two brothers are farming side by side: Allan McCracken (1820-   ) at  Lot 24 of Concession Front A, with 200 acres and 40 acres under cultivation, and Thomas McCracken on  Lot 23 of Conc. Front  A, with 140 acres and 6 acres under cultivation. The Front A Concession was waterfront on the Ottawa River along the southeastern shore of Lower Allumette Lake, in the Perretton area of the township. The Descendants of Allan McCracken &...

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KEYES, Hugh and Sarah Morrow Keyes

Hugh Keyes was born in  1791 in Ballykilbeg, County Down, Ireland. He died in  1873 in Drummond Twp., Lanark County, Canada – a world away. He and wife Sarah Morrow  (1796- 1858) immigrated with their four young children and came to settle in Lanark County, Upper Canada. The sea voyage would have occurred around 1827 because their fifth child, William, was born in Canada. Their children were: 1. Joseph Keyes (1819 – 1900) was born in Belfast, County Down, Ireland, death 26 Oct....

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MILLAR, Christopher and Sarah Allison

We first meet young Christopher Millar as a  lad of 17 in his parent’s household in Pakenham, Lanark County. Both parents are listed as Ireland-born and all the 9 children were born in Upper Canada. Father Christopher Millar (1812-1877) was born 1812 in Limerick, Ireland; mother Elizabeth “Eliza” Comba ( 1814-1886), and both parents are buried at Cedar Hill Cemetery, Pakenham. Fourth child Christopher Millar (1842-1920) m.  Sarah Allison (1848 –1924) in 1868; the...

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LEBEAU, (LEBO, LABOW) James and Lydia “Liddy” Moore

When noting this family’s many versions of the surname, it is best to be flexible. The Lebeau’s, like many French-Canadian families in the British Colony of Upper Canada, found that Anglicizing the name helped the members to be successfully integrated and  prosper in a predominantly English-speaking community. In that era, society was stratified;  Scots and Brits were top rung,  the Irish and the French were lower rungs.  Lebeau, Lebo, Labow are all found in the...

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MCLELLAN (McClelland), John and Ann Given McGill

John McClelland was born in 1800 in Paisley, Renfrewshire, Scotland. He would die a world away 84 years later. His wife Ann Given McGill (1806-1892) was also born in Paisley and together they are buried in Ross Township. Ann was the daughter of James McGill and Jane Given. The children were young family lived at Chapeau, Quebec, on Allumette Island for some time. Later John at age 78 and Ann, aged 75, lived on the Queen’s Line of Ross Twp., in the 1881 Census for that township. Their...

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LITTLE, Thomas and Margaret Carr Elliott

Scottish “immigrant ancestor”  Thomas Little would make the Ottawa Valley his home, raise a large family of thirteen children  and live to 94 years of age. He was a Victorian colonial success when Queen Victoria ruled the Empire; 1840 to 1904. He was the son of Robert Little (1810-  ) and Helen Scott (1814-  ) of Roxburghshire, Scotland, and came to Canada with his family when he was 4 years of age in 1842. Thomas Little (1838-1932) m. Margaret Carr Elliott (1848-1914) lived...

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HUNTINGTON, Samuel and Ann Bower Huntington

When Samuel Adams Huntington (1811 – 1894), came to Westmeath Township in the 1850s, he was joining his extended family. His mother Mary Adams Huntington was a sister to one  of Westmeath’s founders;  Samuel Adams. See ADAMS entry. His Uncle Sam Adams was prospering in Westmeath both as a land developer and  as a lumberman and opportunities were all around for young men willing to work and get ahead. Two nephews would join Sam, settle down and play a part in the life of Westmeath...

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MCCAGHERTY, Patrick & Eliza Edmunson

Patrick McCagherty (1812 – ) and Elizabeth “Eliza” Edmunson (1815 – 1871) were Irish “immigrant ancestors” skilled in the art of weaving so found a ready customer base in the emerging Westmeath Township settlements. Their son Patrick McCagherty Jr., was born in  1845 in Ireland and came to Upper Canada with the family. He married Elizabeth Ann Bromley (1847 –  ), daughter of William Bromley and Eliza Brownlee  on the Bromley Line of Westmeath Township. See BROMLEY...

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LEBLANC, Theophile and Henriette Belanger

For old French-Canadian families, long  settled in the Montreal area, the opening up of new lands to the west was a huge draw. Men were needed up the Ottawa River and its tributaries both in the booming lumbering industry and to settle the newly cleared farmlands. To avoid the turbulence of the Roche Fendu rapids, the river’s channel to the north of Grand Calumet Island was the safer route. Farther upstream, the ties between Gower Point, (later called LaPasse), of Westmeath Township,...

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MCLEAN, John Charles & Elizabeth Hoskins

William McLean, came to Canada in 1817 and settled near Perth, Ontario. He had five children by his first wife, Ellen Rudsdale. Their son, John Charles McLean (1836-1922), moved to Renfrew County and settled on Zion Line, near Beachburg with his wife Elizabeth Hoskins. He spelled his name MacLean. There seems to be both Mc and Mac in various records. “McLean or Maclean is a family name that goes back many years in the history of Beachburg. In some cases the spelling of the family name varies...

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LABINE, Brothers Olivier and Joseph

LaBine family roots went deep in the early colonial history of North America;  Acadians  were early French colonists who settled in what are now our Maritime Provinces;  with the biggest population in Nova Scotia. They were often pawns in the back-and-forth of  colonial wars and French Acadians developed a separate culture from French Québécois. Two LaBine/Labine branches settled in Westmeath Township. freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~guedrylabinefamily/. The many versions of the...

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MCDONALD, War of 1812 Veteran Brothers

Up on the hillside to the west of Highway 17 along Sutherland Road, lies a tiny burying grounds that had been lost to the regrowth of trees and shrubs. This little cemetery has been brought back into the modern day by the efforts of one curious and determined man; Bernie Buechman. As a result of these efforts, the municipality has now designated the cemetery to be of Cultural Heritage value or interest within the Ontario Heritage Trust.  Designate the McDonald Burial Ground under the Ontario...

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MACDONALD, Archibald and Harriet Jackson

It is just a small item in an old newspaper, but for one family it marked an event that would change a life path. David Macdonald has submitted the edition of  The Pembroke Advertiser dated the 5th of July, 1867, in which his Great-Grandparents Archibald and Harriet Macdonald lost their home and blacksmith business in the Village of Beachburgh, (then spelled with an ending “h”), Archibald R. Macdonald  was paying  10% per annum on the mortgage on his land: South part Lot 67,...

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LYTTLE, Henry and Jane

Only rarely do we have a first-hand account of a meeting with an early settler, so this entry set out in William Logan’s 1845  field notes is extra special; –  although not an altogether flattering description of the navigational powers of Mr. Lyttle,  his “gift of the blarney” is noted. Friday 5 September 1845: The party heads inland from Bellows Bay to the current Lookout Road area: “Mr. McNaughton, Mr. McDougal & I have been to the petrifying spring, which...

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McGONEGAL, Andrew & Elizabeth “Eliza” Kenny

Andrew McGonegal, an Irishman born about 1815, is the first of this clan to come to Westmeath Township and his stone in Greenwood Cemetery shows he lived a long life to age 84 years. Andrew McGonegal (1822-1900) m. Elizabeth “Eliza” Kenny (1835-1881). The 1861 Census Westmeath Township records three small children in the family. John, William and Mary are 4; 3; and 1 years old. Both Andrew McGonegal and Eliza Kenny are Irish immigrants, having each arrived separately with their own...

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MCCLELLAND, Robert & Eliza McLean McClelland

“The following is a brief history of the McClelland family of Beachburg, Ontario; all descendants of Robert McClelland and Eliza McLean of Ireland.” So begins a family history prepared by Maureen Carey Pegg and submitted by Edgar White. Robert McClelland was born in the County Armaugh, Ireland, in 1819 or 1820.  He married Eliza McLean of County Monaghan. In 1850 this young couple and their two children Margaret and Hiram set out for Canada. After eleven weeks at sea they “lived in...

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LYONS, Henry James and Emily Hodgins Lyons

HENRY JAMES LYONS (1830-1907) was born in Wicklow, Ireland. After coming to Canada, he married a girl from Modreeny, Tipperary, Ireland, named EMILY “EMMA” HODGINS (1830-1915). Emily was the daughter of Matthew Hodgins and Sarah Green and came to Canada in 1852. She was working as a maid in Bytown (Ottawa) when they met and they married in 1859. This starts the history of the Lyons Family written using notes prepared by Goldie Pearl Farnel Stephens and submitted by Edgar White. Mrs....

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HOWARD, Keyworth Daniel and Alice Edith Condie

Keyworth Howard was the last in a family of ten children. His father Robert Daniel Howard had settled in Ross Township, adjacent to Westmeath Township, with his wife Mary Jane Johnson (1845-1913) a woman from Claredon Twp., Pontiac County, on the Lower Canada side of the Ottawa River. Her parents were Cotie Thompson Johnston (1812-1888) and Nancy Ann Moore (1813-1887). Mary Jane would marry a second time to George Lane. The children of Robert Daniel Howard and Mary Jane Johnson were: Cassandra...

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LADEROUTE, Charles Boyer and Marie Smith

When Jean- Baptiste Boyer (1699-  ), known as Joseph, left his native Provence, in the south of France; and set sail for New France; he would never believe that some of his descendants would populate his new homeland under a different surname; but that is indeed what happened. The  explanation of why some of the children of Charles Boyer and Marie Smith in the mid-1800’s decided to adopt the surname of LADEROUTE has been lost in time. But church records show that some in that family of...

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